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2nd Grade Team Page

Second graders at Blood Brook

Second graders exploring Blood Brook.

Curriculum

English Language Arts

Listening

  • Listen respectfully to peers and adults
  • Listen critically to discussions and stories
  • Build spoken vocabulary
  • Comprehend facts and main ideas in stories
  • Listen to and enjoy various forms of literature

Speaking

  • Participate in class discussion
  • Select a topic of interest and speak about it
  • Retell a story
  • Share a creative writing
  • Memorize and present poetry and songs
  • Develop self-confidence and feel free to express him/herself
  • Take responsibility for the impact of his/her words on others

Writing

Writing Process:

  • Write daily using self and teacher selected topics and activities
  • Plan, write, revise, edit, and share a fiction or non-fiction story with a main idea, a logical sequence, and supporting details
  • Write for different purposes (fiction, non-fiction, letters and poetry)

Genres:

  • Report writing, autobiography, narrative, essay, poetry, letter writing

Spelling:

  • Use phonetic spelling
  • Practice the 50 most frequently used words
  • Learn phonics-based word lists
  • Learn the six syllable types

Grammar, Usage and Mechanics

  • Punctuate using periods and question marks
  • Capitalize first word in a sentence; pronoun "I"; names of persons, pets, places; and titles of poems and stories
  • Expand simple sentences by using descriptive words and phrases

Handwriting:
  • Review and practice correct formation of D'Nealian manuscript letters
  • Use relative sizing and correct spacing

Reading

Reading Skills:
  • Continue to develop sound/symbol relationships with special focus on vowels, digraphs, consonant blends, and commonly used prefixes and suffixes
  • Refine word attack strategies including context and picture clues, syntax, phonetic and structural analysis

Reading Comprehension

  • Read, discuss, and identify various forms and genres of literature
  • Demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension
  • Summarize text
  • Identify the main idea, setting, main characters, other characters, sequence, problem and solution

Independent Reading:

  • Read for pleasure
  • Select appropriate reading materials
  • Read silently for an increasing period of time

Core Literature Studies

Teacher Read-Aloud Books:
Homer Price, The Trumpet of the Swan, Mr. Popper's Penguins Arctic books, Caldecott Medal Winners

Author Studies:
Barbara Cooney, Patricia Polacco

Genre Studies: Caldecott books, poetry, Aesop's Fables, Inuit and Mexican folktales, biographies

Math

Numbers and Numeration

  • Count, read, and write numbers by 1’s to 1000
  • Skip count by 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s to 100
  • Define and label odd and even numbers
  • Recognize and repeat patterns
  • Understand and use place value
  • Review and expand knowledge of fractions

Computation and Estimation

  • Recognize and use math symbols (+ , - , < , >)
  • Add and subtract up to 3-digit numbers without regrouping
  • Add two 3-digit numbers with regrouping
  • Know math facts to 20 (+/-)
  • Fill in missing numbers in equations
  • Use computation skills to solve story problems
  • Recognize, name, and identify value of coins
  • Count money and make change

Measurement

  • Measure using appropriate units (inches, feet, yards, centimeters, meters)
  • Expand knowledge of money (value of coins, adding amounts up to $1.00)
  • Name days of week, months of year, and seasons
  • Read a thermometer in Celsius and Fahrenheit
  • Tell time to quarter-hour

Geometry

  • Recognize and name common two and three- dimensional shapes
  • Learn and apply geometric terms: open/closed, line, point, perpendicular, parallel, symmetrical, area, perimeter

Data Collection and Analysis

  • Collect and organize data
  • Make and read bar graphs, line graphs, pie graphs, and pictographs

Problem Solving, Reasoning and Communication

  • Approach problem solving systematically and creatively
  • Apply problem solving strategies to more complex problems
  • Practice spatial problem solving

Patterns, Functions and Algebra

  • Represent a concrete model of a pattern symbolically
  • Classify, sort and order objects

Science

Process Skills

  • Explore and observe, describe, measure, sort, compare, classify, collect information, record, graph, communicate

Content

Physical Science: Electricity

  • Simple circuitry
  • Magnetism

Life Science: Streams

  • Habitat (Riparian Zone)
  • Life forms and adaptations
  • Stewardship

Earth Science: Polar Regions/Weather
  • The effects of extreme climate adaptations in polar regions
  • The light/darkness cycle

Health: Overview of Human Body

  • Healthy, unhealthy foods
  • Food groups
  • Balanced diet

Social Studies

Polar Regions

  • Geography and ecology of the region
  • Culture and art of the Inuit people
  • Adaptations to the Arctic, Antarctic
  • Related literature

Mexico

  • Geography and climate of the region
  • Culture and art of the people of Mexico
  • Introduction to Mayan history
  • Related literature

1890s/Immigration

  • Compare/contrast past to present
  • ”Melting Pot” discussion
  • Immigration - family history

Geography

  • Map skills (drawing simple maps, map key, cardinal directions, locating places on globe/maps)
  • Grade-level land and water terms

Social Skills

Civic and Social Responsibility

  • Work independently
  • Work cooperatively

Communication

  • Wait to speak
  • Use appropriate, clear voice

Personal Development

  • Be a good sport
  • Respect space of others
  • Try new things

Art

The aim of the art program at the Marion Cross School is to provide children with specific skills and varied media, at every grade level and every ability level, to enable them to express their unique responses, ideas and reactions within a basic artistic framework. Art education does not stand alone. It blends with, augments and enriches the total school curriculum.

Second graders begin the year by contributing a piece to the all-school collaborative art project that celebrates our coming together to become a school community. In second grade, students go on to learn about the Elements of Art of line, shape, color (selection, balance, mixing), composition, proportion, pattern and repetition. They do this through a variety of projects including the following: sunflower paintings, ceramic bowls/vessels, “stream” grass weavings, cornhusk people, haunted house neighborhood collage, star books (folded paper), positive/negative designs, Valentine wood magnets, spiders and web construction, tissue paper flowers, God’s Eye mobiles, fruit and vegetable prints, paper making, color mixing, Inuit/Arctic projects (scrimshaw, shaman masks, Inuit yo-yos), ArtStart, and LEEEP art books (streams).

Guidance


The school counselor, Katie Cormier, visits each second grade classroom weekly. We continue to use the Second Step Social Emotional Learning Program to increase students’ school success and decrease problem behaviors by promoting social emotional competence and self-regulation skills. There are four units in the curriculum: skills for learning, empathy, emotion management and friendship skills and problem solving, and the skills are honed and practiced at a deeper level at this grade level. In addition to Second Step, our amazing local resource, WISE, comes to conduct Care for Kids lessons, which is a health-based early childhood healthy sexuality and abuse prevention curriculum.. Mr. Minelli, MCS’s technology teacher, also comes in to co-teach for two lessons with Katie on internet safety based on common sense media’s digital citizenship program. There are also supplemental lessons focused on kindness, being an upstander (anti-bullying). Puppets, songs, and movement are all used to help practice these skills.

Information Technology


Best practices in education indicate that technology is best incorporated into a student’s education as an embedded “tool” used to support learning in the major curricular fields. This means that tech isn’t something just to “do” for students; rather it is used where appropriate to help students succeed in their other subject areas.

Toward those goals, 2nd grade students at MCS regularly use the iPads for various learning opportunities, including as a literacy station in their classroom. This includes several different apps that help with phonics and improving reading skills. We also have a wide range of apps that help with things such as math skills, learning to tell time, and exploring parts of the human body. MCS uses the assessment software, Track My Progress, and 2nd grade students are testing 4 times per year in Math and ELA using a computer adaptive test that can help teachers and parents understand the student’s strengths in various areas of these subjects. 2nd grade students also are using Symphony Math to help improve their math concepts and understanding and are given subscriptions to iXL mathematics to improve their math skills. Along with Katie Cormier, our school counselor, we also use a select group of lessons with 2nd grade students about the topic of safe computer use. These include such areas as computer safety, privacy, and the prevention of Cyberbullying. The lessons come from the highly regarded I.S. site, Common Sense Media.

Library Skills

Organization and Location of Library Materials
  • Know about the spine label
  • Locate books by the author's last name

Recognition and Use of Periodicals

  • Be familiar with primary periodicals
  • Know that periodicals may be borrowed

Use of Library Browser Online Catalog

  • Recognize the online catalog
  • Know how to type in an entry and access information

Use of Reference Collection

  • Learn about encyclopedias (location, use, spine labels, alphabetized topics)


Recognition of Parts of a Book

  • Identify title page
  • Identify author, illustrator and title

Recognition of Fiction and Non-Fiction>

  • Determine the difference between the two

Selection and Evaluation Techniques

  • Choose with assistance books that he/she is able to read
  • Choose books on subjects of personal interest and on subjects related to school projects
  • Recognize the Caldecott Medal and Red Clover Award

Literature Appreciation

  • Recognize characters and authors of favorite picture books
  • Recognize fables and folktales

Music

The Marion Cross community sings. We sing silly songs and mundane songs, great classics and new “pop” songs with surprisingly profound meanings, songs written by the students and songs in other languages from across the world, and just about everything in between.

MCS students learn all about music in other ways, too. They listen to it, talk about it, write about it, move to it, and dance to it. They learn it “by ear,” they read it on the staff, and they write a fair bit of it on their own, too. They learn to play instruments in the school’s chamber orchestra, band, and electives.

Music in Second Grade

The students and I spend most of our music time learning new songs, exploring their budding voices, dancing, and playing circle games set to music. They learn to sing, but they also to express themselves in music and be part of a musical community. Along the way they learn to read more and more rhythm patterns and all seven Curwen hand signs.

Sing-Along

Second graders students start the week with a joyous Sing-Along held by our multi-talented principal Mr. Bill.

Composing

Second graders also write their own music. Each class works together to create an original Animal Facts Rap; each student gets a chance to set an animal Haiku to music and hear it performed by their classmates.

PE

The main objective of the physical education program for Grade 2 is to encourage all children to enjoy and participate in physical activities by building on the interest and enthusiasm created in kindergarten. First and second grade activities expand upon all of the activities explored in kindergarten. Games and activities become more organized or challenging, skill work is introduced, and classes become more formal and organized but follow the same specific objectives.

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